Basil Addison Williams

Basil Addison Williams served during the Korean War as a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He was reported as Missing in Action on November 26, 1950. He was declared Missing in Action and declared deceased on December 31, 1953, and posthumously promoted to the rank of Corporal. His name is inscribed on the Courts of the Missing, at the Honolulu Memorial and also at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

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Basil Addison Williams was born in Clay County, Alabama on February 22, 1932, and lived most of his life in Talladega. He attended Northside School and Dixon Junior High before joining the United States Army in 1949.


He served during the Korean War as a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He was reported as Missing in Action on November 26, 1950. He was declared Missing in Action and declared deceased on December 31, 1953, and posthumously promoted to the rank of Corporal. His name is inscribed on the Courts of the Missing, Court #8 at the Honolulu Memorial in Hawaii, on the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., on the U.S.S. Alabama – Battleship Park in Mobile, Alabama, and the War Memorial of Korea, Seoul South Korea.


Basil’s parents were Freeman Doc Williams and Hattie Robinson Williams. His sisters and brothers were Luleen Williams Reeves, Irene Williams Murner, Lucille Williams Poe, Juanita Williams Barnett, Fred Williams, and Glover Dick Williams. He is survived by nieces Peggy Huffstetler, Jane Wilson, Evelin Cox, Bernie Irvin, Shelby Jones, Sharon Hughston, Brenda Murner Parks and nephew Buddy Murner, as well as numerous other relatives.


Corporal Williams’ awards and decorations include The Purple Heart, Combat Infantryman Badge, Marksmanship Badge, Korean Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Republic of Korea Presidential Citation, Republic of Korea War Service Medal, United Nations Service Medal, Army Presidential Unit Citation, and The Army Good Conduct Medal.


The Department of Defense reports that 54,246 American service men and women lost their lives during the Korean War—this includes losses worldwide. The online database includes the names of nearly 39,000 service men and women who died during the period of June 27, 1950 to July 27, 1954—including the 8,209 Americans who were missing in action, or lost, or buried at sea.